Ford Escape: Vehicle loading – with and without a trailer - Tires, Wheels and Loading - Ford Escape Owner's ManualFord Escape: Vehicle loading – with and without a trailer

This section will guide you in the proper loading of your vehicle and/or trailer, to keep your loaded vehicle weight within its design rating capability, with or without a trailer. Properly loading your vehicle will provide maximum return of vehicle design performance. Before loading your vehicle, familiarize yourself with the following terms for determining your vehicle’s weight ratings, with or without a trailer, from the vehicle’s Tire Label or Safety Compliance Certification Label:

Base Curb Weight – is the weight of the vehicle including a full tank of fuel and all standard equipment. It does not include passengers, cargo, or optional equipment.

Vehicle Curb Weight – is the weight of your new vehicle when you picked it up from your authorized dealer plus any aftermarket equipment.

Payload – is the combined weight of cargo and passengers that the

Payload – is the combined weight of cargo and passengers that the vehicle is carrying. The maximum payload for your vehicle can be found on the Tire Label on the B-Pillar or the edge of the driver’s door (vehicles exported outside the US and Canada may not have a Tire Label). Look for “THE COMBINED WEIGHT OF OCCUPANTS AND CARGO SHOULD NEVER EXCEED XXX kg OR XXX lb.” for maximum payload. The payload listed on the Tire Label is the maximum payload for the vehicle as built by the assembly plant. If any aftermarket or authorized-dealer installed equipment has been installed on the vehicle, the weight of the equipment must be subtracted from the payload listed on the Tire Label in order to determine the new payload.

be limited either by volume capacity (how much space is WARNING: The appropriate loading capacity of your vehicle can be limited either by volume capacity (how much space is available) or by payload capacity (how much weight the vehicle should carry). Once you have reached the maximum payload of your vehicle, do not add more cargo, even if there is space available. Overloading or improperly loading your vehicle can contribute to loss of vehicle control and vehicle rollover.

Example only:

Cargo Weight – includes all weight added to the Base Curb Weight,

Cargo Weight – includes all weight added to the Base Curb Weight, including cargo and optional equipment. When towing, trailer tongue load or king pin weight is also part of cargo weight.

GAW (Gross Axle Weight) – is the total weight placed on each axle (front and rear) – including vehicle curb weight and all payload.

GAWR (Gross Axle Weight Rating) – is the maximum allowable weight that can be carried by a single axle (front or rear). These numbers are shown on the Safety Compliance Certification Label located on the B-Pillar or the edge of the driver’s door. The total load on each axle must never exceed its GAWR.

Note: For trailer towing information refer to Trailer towing found in this chapter or the RV and Trailer Towing Guide provided by your authorized dealer.

GVW (Gross Vehicle Weight) – is the Vehicle Curb Weight + cargo +

GVW (Gross Vehicle Weight) – is the Vehicle Curb Weight + cargo + passengers.

GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating) – is the maximum allowable weight of the fully loaded vehicle (including all options, equipment, passengers and cargo). The GVWR is shown on the Safety Compliance Certification Label located on the B-Pillar or the edge of the driver’s door. The GVW must never exceed the GVWR.

• Example only:

WARNING: Exceeding the Safety Compliance Certification Label

vehicle weight rating limits could result in substandard vehicle WARNING: Exceeding the Safety Compliance Certification Label vehicle weight rating limits could result in substandard vehicle handling or performance, engine, transmission and/or structural damage, serious damage to the vehicle, loss of control and personal injury.

GCW (Gross Combined Weight) – is the weight of the loaded vehicle

GCW (Gross Combined Weight) – is the weight of the loaded vehicle (GVW) plus the weight of the fully loaded trailer.

GCWR (Gross Combined Weight Rating) – is the maximum allowable weight of the vehicle and the loaded trailer – including all cargo and passengers – that the vehicle can handle without risking damage.

(Important: The towing vehicle’s braking system is rated for operation at GVWR, not at GCWR.) Separate functional brakes should be used for safe control of towed vehicles and for trailers where the GCW of the towing vehicle plus the trailer exceed the GVWR of the towing vehicle.

The GCW must never exceed the GCWR.

Maximum Loaded Trailer Weight – is the highest possible weight of a fully loaded trailer the vehicle can tow. It assumes a vehicle with only mandatory options, no cargo (internal or external), a tongue load of 10–15% (conventional trailer) or king pin weight of 15–25% (fifth wheel trailer), and driver only (150 lb. [68 kg]). Consult your authorized dealer (or the RV and Trailer Towing Guide provided by your authorized dealer) for more detailed information.

Tongue Load or Fifth Wheel King Pin Weight – refers to the amount of the weight that a trailer pushes down on a trailer hitch.

Examples: For a 5,000 lb. (2,268 kg) conventional trailer, multiply 5,000 by 0.10 and 0.15 to obtain a proper tongue load range of 500 to 750 lb.

(227 to 340 kg). For an 11,500 lb. (5,216 kg) fifth wheel trailer, multiply by 0.15 and 0.25 to obtain a proper king pin load range of 1,725 to 2,875 lb. (782 to 1,304 kg)

the Safety Compliance Certification Label. WARNING: Do not exceed the GVWR or the GAWR specified on the Safety Compliance Certification Label.

carrying capacities than the original tires because they may WARNING: Do not use replacement tires with lower load carrying capacities than the original tires because they may lower the vehicle’s GVWR and GAWR limitations. Replacement tires with a higher limit than the original tires do not increase the GVWR and GAWR limitations.

result in serious damage to the vehicle and/or personal injury. WARNING: Exceeding any vehicle weight rating limitation could result in serious damage to the vehicle and/or personal injury.

Steps for determining the correct load limit:

1. Locate the statement “The combined weight of occupants and cargo should never exceed XXX kg or XXX lb.” on your vehicle’s placard.

2. Determine the combined weight of the driver and passengers that will be riding in your vehicle.

3. Subtract the combined weight of the driver and passengers from XXX kg or XXX lb.

4. The resulting figure equals the available amount of cargo and luggage load capacity. For example, if the “XXX” amount equals 1,400 lb. and there will be five 150 lb. passengers in your vehicle, the amount of available cargo and luggage load capacity is 650 lb. (1400-750 (5 x 150) = 650 lb.). In metric units (635-340 (5 x 68) = 295 kg.) 5. Determine the combined weight of luggage and cargo being loaded on the vehicle. That weight may not safely exceed the available cargo and luggage load capacity calculated in Step 4.

6. If your vehicle will be towing a trailer, load from your trailer will be transferred to your vehicle. Consult this manual to determine how this reduces the available cargo and luggage load capacity of your vehicle.

The following gives you a few examples on how to calculate the available amount of cargo and luggage load capacity:

• Another example for your vehicle with 1,400 lb. (635 kg) of cargo and luggage capacity. You decide to go golfing. Is there enough load capacity to carry you, 4 of your friends and all the golf bags? You and four friends average 220 lb. (99 kg) each and the golf bags weigh approximately 30 lb. (13.5 kg) each. The calculation would be: 1400 - (5 x 220) - (5 x 30) = 1400 - 1100 - 150 = 150 lb. Yes, you have enough load capacity in your vehicle to transport four friends and your golf bags. In metric units, the calculation would be: 635 kg - (5 x 99 kg) - (5 x 13.5 kg) = 635 - 495 - 67.5 = 72.5 kg.

• A final example for your vehicle with 1,400 lb. (635 kg) of cargo and luggage capacity. You and one of your friends decide to pick up cement from the local home improvement store to finish that patio you have been planning for the past 2 years. Measuring the inside of the vehicle with the rear seat folded down, you have room for 12-100 lb. (45 kg) bags of cement. Do you have enough load capacity to transport the cement to your home? If you and your friend each weigh 220 lb. (99 kg), the calculation would be: 1400 - (2 x 220) - (12 x 100) = 1400 - 440 - 1200 = - 240 lb. No, you do not have enough cargo capacity to carry that much weight. In metric units, the calculation would be: 635 kg - (2 x 99 kg) - (12 x 45 kg) = 635 - 198 - 540 = -103 kg. You will need to reduce the load weight by at least 240 lb. (104 kg). If you remove 3-100 lb. (45 kg) cement bags, then the load calculation would be:

1400 - (2 x 220) - (9 x 100) = 1400 - 440 - 900 = 60 lb. Now you have the load capacity to transport the cement and your friend home. In metric units, the calculation would be: 635 kg - (2 x 99 kg) - (9 x 45 kg) = 635 - 198 - 405 = 32 kg.

The above calculations also assume that the loads are positioned in your vehicle in a manner that does not overload the Front or the Rear Gross Axle Weight Rating specified for your vehicle on the Safety Compliance Certification Label found on the edge of the driver’s door.

Special loading instructions for owners of pick-up trucks and utility-type vehicles

of this type of vehicle, see the Preparing to drive your vehicle WARNING: For important information regarding safe operation of this type of vehicle, see the Preparing to drive your vehicle section in the Driving chapter of this owner’s guide.

unloaded vehicles. Extra precautions, such as slower speeds and WARNING: Loaded vehicles may handle differently than unloaded vehicles. Extra precautions, such as slower speeds and increased stopping distance, should be taken when driving a heavily loaded vehicle.

Your vehicle can haul more cargo and people than most passenger cars.

Depending upon the type and placement of the load, hauling cargo and people may raise the center of gravity of the vehicle.

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